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Monday, July 28, 2014

McClelland is PGFD's Newest Deputy Fire Chief

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

James “Jim” McClelland, a longtime volunteer member will report to work this week at the Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department Headquarters in Largo as a Deputy Fire Chief.  For the first time in many years, he will have both a new employer and title.

The largest and busiest combination—career, civilian and volunteer—system in the country, the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department has 45 stations and annually responds to more than 130,000 calls.  It employs over 800 firefighters, paramedics and civilians and has about 1600 volunteer members. 

Jim McClelland was appointed as Deputy Fire Chief by County Executive Rushern L. Baker III, and will head the Volunteer Services Command.  While this is a salaried position, he had been serving in a non-salaried position as Assistant Fire Chief and Volunteer Operations Commander for the Department.  He reported to both emergency and non-emergency scenes, where he commanded or assisted in the command of incidents.

McClelland was working at the University of Maryland but retired from there after accepting this appointment.  McClelland replaces Frank Underwood who was the first to be appointed as the Commander of the Volunteer Services and served nearly two years until his departure in 2013.  The position has remained vacant since that time. 

McClelland has been a member of the Capitol Heights Volunteer Fire Department since October 1970, having served in a variety of capacities that include line officer, command officer, and executive officer.  He also served 14 years as Deputy Chief, 24 years as Chief, and President for 6 years.  Jim represents the third of four generations serving in the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department.  In April 1991, he was appointed to the position of Volunteer Division Chief and Volunteer Major in December 2000.   

McClelland has served in other leadership roles within the County’s fire service, including 12 years as Vice Chairman of the Prince George’s County Volunteer Chiefs’ Council and 3 years as the Chairman.  He has also served on numerous committees, task forces and work groups and currently chairs the Communication Work Group and co-chairs  the 57th Avenue SIT Implementation Task.

In 2001, James McClelland was inducted into the Prince George’s County Volunteer Fire & Rescue Association’s Hall of Fame and selected as the Maryland State Firemen’s Association “2003 Firefighter of the Year.”  

McClelland resides in Bowie, Maryland.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

POTENTIAL FOR SEVERE WEATHER TODAY - STAY INFORMED!!!



MEDIA CONTACT: MARK E. BRADY, CHIEF SPOKESPERSON, 240-508-7930
MEBRADY@CO.PG.MD.US     @PGFDPIO




The National Weather Service has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook for Prince George's County and surrounding jurisdictions. There is a potential for sever weather this afternoon and evening.  


The Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department urges everyone to take
appropriate measures to stay safe if sever weather does occur. Become familiar with how to stay safe and monitor local media reports for breaking weather news,


THE FOLLOWING IS THIS MORNINGS FORECAST FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE:

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
732 AM EDT SUN JUL 27 2014

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR THE MARYLAND PORTION OF THE
CHESAPEAKE BAY...TIDAL POTOMAC RIVER...AND ADJACENT COUNTIES IN
CENTRAL MARYLAND AND NORTHERN VIRGINIA AS WELL AS THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT

THUNDERSTORMS ARE LIKELY TODAY AND TONIGHT. THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE
CAPABLE OF PRODUCING DAMAGING WIND GUSTS...LARGE HAIL...ISOLATED
TORNADOES AND LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL THAT COULD LEAD TO FLASH
FLOODING. THE MOST LIKELY TIME FOR THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WILL
DURING THE AFTERNOON AND EVENING HOURS.

A SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IS IN EFFECT FOR THE WATERS THIS AFTERNOON
AND EVENING. A SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY CONTINUES LATE TONIGHT FOR THE
MARYLAND CHESAPEAKE BAY FROM SANDY POINT TO SMITH POINT AND THE
LOWER TIDAL POTOMAC RIVER FROM COBB ISLAND TO SMITH POINT.



It is important that everyone monitors local media updates concerning the weather.

Keep your phones, tablets and laptops charged to capacity throughout today.

Take appropriate actions for safety before, during and after the storms.

Have your emergency kit prepared and ready.

For additional information on how to stay safe visit:

READY.GOV

The Weather Channel

Stay Informed - Stay Ready - Stay Safe!!!

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Brad Paisley Pays Tribute to Firefighters with Song - Hails from a Firefighting Family!!!


MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

Brad Paisley has always been a favorite country performer but his popularity amongst firefighters just went red hot.  Who knew Paisley is part of a firefighting family??  Paisley's family includes firefighters starting with his father.  So he didn't need to go far for inspiration for a song about firefighters, "All In," is featured in the upcoming Disney Film, "Planes: Fire & Rescue."  


"My father's a firefighter," Paisley said in promotion for the children's film. "He was my whole life. And my brother-in-law and several family members are firefighters. I was really honored to pay tribute to them. I sat down after seeing a rough cut of the movie and it came to me very quickly."  The entire Rolling Stone interview can be read by clicking here.

A recent USA TODAY article had these quotes from Brad;

"The movie is essentially a tribute to firefighters told through these planes," says Paisley, 41. "When John pitched the idea, he said it was a way of paying tribute to my dad. My brother-in-law is also a firefighter in Tennessee. These guys run toward the problem that everyone else is fleeing from."  Paisley's childhood in Glen Dale, W.Va., was dominated by the firefighter lifestyle. His father, 65, was the assistant chief of the local volunteer force and an emergency medical technician.

Firefighters were Paisley's heroes and he recalls the many visits to the station.
"My earliest memories are on these fire trucks," says Paisley. "There are more photographs of me from age 5 to 10 on these fire engines than there are photographs of me on birthdays."

Even on family vacations his father used to seek out the local fire department and ask to check out the trucks. Paisley says if he wasn't sidetracked by success as a musician in Nashville, he might have gone into the profession.

Being part of a firefighters family means you are part of an extended family of firefighters everywhere.  I often tell family members that if they ever get into a jam, wherever you are at, go to the nearest fire station.  Brad Paisley is already part of a firefighting family and is welcome anytime in Prince George's County, Maryland.  Brad - you have an open invitation to visit with our family of firefighters and ride along with us at any time.  

If things don't work out for you with singing, we have a spot for you here as a Fire Fighter in Prince George's County, Maryland. (:


Image from USA TODAY shows Paisley temporarily trading the cowboy hat for a fire helmet during a viewing of the upcoming Disney film "Planes: Fire & Rescue"



"All In" featured in the upcoming Disney film "Planes: Fire & Rescue"

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Potential for Hazardous Weather Today - Stay Informed-Ready-Safe

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

The weather forecast for Tuesday, July 15, includes the potential for strong to severe storms that could result in Flash Flooding.  

Here is today's Hazardous Weather Outlook from the National Weather Service (NWS).

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT

THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED...ESPECIALLY THIS AFTERNOON AND
EVENING. THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING DAMAGING WIND
GUSTS AND HEAVY DOWNPOURS THAT COULD LEAD TO LOCALIZED FLASH
FLOODING.

Anticipate the NWS to post warnings later today concerning thunderstorms and flash flooding.  Please keep informed about today's weather.  Monitor local media for updates.

For safety information on thunderstorms and lightening we want to refer you to our partners at FEMA, please, click here.

Flash Flood Facts...
Flash floods occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall or a dam failure. Flooding is a longer-term event and may last a week or more.
Most flash flooding is caused by (1) slow-moving thunderstorms, (2) thunder-storms repeatedly moving over the same area or (3) heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms.
Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, and destroy buildings and bridges.
Densely populated areas have a high risk for flash floods. The construction of buildings, highways, driveways, and parking lots increases runoff by reducing the amount of rain absorbed by the ground.
Water can erode the roadbed creating unsafe driving conditions.
Many flash floods occur at night when flooded roads are hard to see.
2 feet of water will float your car, truck or SUV!!! 6 inches of fast-moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.
Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are auto related. If your car stalls, leave it and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely.
Underpasses can fill rapidly with water, while the adjacent roadway remains clear. Driving into a flooded underpass can quickly put you in 5-6 feet of water.
The Prince George's County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department wants you to stay safe during this potentially dangerous weather conditions.  Help us by helping yourself and heed warnings and safety tips.
Flash Flood Safety Tips...
Never try to walk, swim, or drive through swift-moving floodwater. Remember, 2 feet of water will float your vehicle and 6 inches of fast moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.
If you come upon floodwaters, STOP, TURN AROUND AND GO ANOTHER WAY!!
Do not attempt to drive through a flooded road.
If your car stalls in high water, DON'T PANIC, leave your car and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely and call 911.
Stay informed about the storm and possible flooding by listening to your NOAA weather radio, commercial radio or television.
STAY INFORMED - STAY READY - STAY SAFE!!!