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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Upper Marlboro Pizza Hut Damaged in Early Morning Fire

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

A 5:00 am blaze significantly damaged the Upper Marlboro Pizza Hut (Mike Boone)
An early morning fire caused significant damage to the Upper Marlboro Pizza Hut. At about 4:40 am, Tuesday, November 30, 2010, firefighters were dispatched to the 7600 block of South Osborne Road, near Rt 301, in Upper Marlboro for a building fire.

Fire/EMS units arrived at the 1-story commercial structure with heavy smoke coming from the roof and what appeared to be a fire in the kitchen area. The fire eventually extended up into and through the roof before it was extinguished around 6:00 am.

Preliminary information indicates that there were no injuries with the cause of the fire still under investigation. Fire loss estimates are still being tabulated

Monday, November 29, 2010

Safety Tips for Electric Space Heaters

A Laurel, Maryland, family may have learned the hard way; however, their loss of property should serve as a reminder to everyone about precautions when using electric space heaters. Fire/EMS units from the Laurel area were alerted to a house fire on Friday evening, November 26, 2010, just after 8:00 pm. Firefighters from Laurel arrived at a 2-story single family home in the 13800 block of Brown Branch Road and quickly extinguished a fire that was started by a space heater igniting nearby combustibles. Fortunately, there were no injuries and fire loss was estimated at $10,000. With cold weather falling upon the region citizens and residents are finding ways to stay warm. It’s no secret that firefighters are busier during the winter months and a main reason is blamed on space heaters. The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department (PGFD) is joining the United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) in offering simple steps to keep you safe.

Citing recent fires in Pennsylvania and Florida which claimed the lives of nine children and one adult and may have been caused by space heaters, the USFA, NFPA and the PGFD want to remind everyone that fire safety and prevention are especially important in the coming months.

“These fires are a painful reminder of what we see every year—the temperatures drop and fires increase,” said NFPA President Jim Shannon. According to NFPA statistics space heaters account for about one third of the home heating fires yet more than 80 percent of the home heating fire deaths.

The Winter Residential Building Fires (PDF, 1Mb) report released by USFA in 2010, reports an estimated 108,400 winter residential building fires occur annually in the United States, resulting in an estimated average of 945 deaths, 3,825 injuries, and $1.7 billion in property loss. Cooking is the leading cause of winter residential building fires at 36 percent followed by heating at 23 percent, and winter residential building fires occur mainly in the early evening hours, peaking from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

“The winter season brings the highest number of home fires than any other time of year,” said USFA’s Acting Fire Administrator Glenn Gaines. “Each winter season, home fires increase in part due to cooking and heating fires.”

Prince George’s County Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones stated, “Fire safety and injury prevention must not be lost in an effort to stay warm. Stay warm and do so safely.”

The men and women, career and volunteer, of the Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department recommend the following safety tips for space heaters.

Electric Space Heaters

• Buy only heaters evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

• Check to make sure it has a thermostat control mechanism, and will switch off automatically if the heater falls over.

• Heaters are not dryers or tables; don't dry clothes or store objects on top of your heater.

• Space heaters need space; keep combustibles at least three feet away from each heater.

• Always unplug your electric space heater when not in use.

Finally, having a working smoke alarm dramatically increases your chances of surviving a fire. Remember to practice a home escape plan frequently with your family. Residents of Prince George’s County can contact our smoke alarm hotline at 301-864-SAFE (7233). A firefighter will install a working smoke alarm in your home; free of charge.

For additional information from the USFA and NFPA on Winter Fire Safety; click here.

PGFD IS PART OF OPRAH'S FAVORITE SHOWS

The Prince George’s County, Maryland, Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department (PGFD) made Oprah’s Favorite Things list!!! The Oprah Show has saved the best for her farewell season, The most fantastical Oprah’s Ultimate Favorite Things ever and PGFD is one of them!

For the past 25 years, The Oprah Show has made saying two little words—"thank you"—into an art form. "We believe in the power of gratitude," Oprah says. In honor of Thanksgiving Day, Oprah is looking back at some of her favorite thank-yous!

Photo is courtesy of http://www.oprah.com/
In February 2004, several firefighters searched for a fallen comrade after he broadcast a MAYDAY. Two PGFD firefighters represented the other members of the rescue team and the entire Fire/EMS Department when they appeared on the Oprah Show to talk about the rescue which was in conjunction with the promotion of the soon to be released “Ladder 49” with John Travolta. Emotions were high as the Fire Lt. Dino Mahaffey surprised Fire Lt. Ken Ward and Firefighter Phil Bird with Medals of Valor which he presented on the show. Dino’s emotional thank-you warranted several boxes of tissues as just about everyone was brought to tears; including Oprah and John Travolta.

The PGFD show made Oprah’s Favorite thank-you show. The show aired on Friday, November 26, 2010. Script and pictures can be viewed here: http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/25-Years-of-Saying-Thank-You/4.

We would also like to acknowledge Fire Fighter/Paramedic Miller Stroud with the City of Memphis, Tennessee, Fire Services for his story making Oprah’s favorite thank-you shows!

PGFD PRESS RELEASE COVERING OPRAH SHOW September 2004

PGFD PRESS RELEASE COVERING ORIGINAL INCIDENT FEBRUARY 2004

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Natural Gas Incident at U of M

Seventy occupants of a child care center on the campus of the University of Maryland were temporary relocated as a precaution while firefighters dealt with a nearby natural gas emergency.

At about 11:30 am a contractor ruptured a natural gas line outside of Denton Dining Hall. Firefighters stood ready awaiting the arrival of the utility company to stop the flow of natural gas. Additionally, firefighters checked nearby buildings for any presence of gas and as a precaution evacuated the day care center.

Washington Gas Company repair crews arrived quickly and made temporary repairs to stop the escape of the gas.

Once the gas was secured and the scene was safe the day care center was allowed to be re-occupied shortly after 12 noon.

No injuries were reported.
Mark E. Brady

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Will PGFD/Travolta/Ladder 49 Show Make Oprah's Favorite Moments???

The Oprah Winfrey Show is in its final season of production. As part of the farewell season, Oprah revisits  her most favorite moments on the show. One of her upcoming shows highlights her favorite “Thank You Day Follow-Ups” and we are hopeful the segment that included members of the Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department (PGFD), John Travolta and the cast of LADDER 49 that aired in September 2004 will make the cut. The show is scheduled to air Friday, November 26, 2010.

PROGRAMMING NOTE – College Football will preempt the regular air time of the Oprah Show Friday, 4:00 pm on ABC networks. The show is scheduled to air later Friday night (1:00 am, Saturday morning) so stay up late or set your recording devices to see if PGFD makes one of Oprah’s favorite moments.

PGFD Original Press Release September 2004

THE OPRAH SHOW LINK OF EPISODE

Monday, November 22, 2010

Public Safety Assistance Annual Food Basket Program


Food Basket -

Media Day will be held on Monday, December 20, 2010, 8:30 am at the Bunker Hill Fire/EMS Station, 3716 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD. 

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Cooking Thanksgiving Dinner Safely

The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department offers the following safety tips, to ensure that all citizens and residents will enjoy a safe and happy Thanksgiving holiday. Unfortunately, fire safety and injury prevention guidelines are often overlooked during the holidays. Prince George's County Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones stated, "By using fire-wise common sense, citizens and residents can avoid tragedy and disruption of their holiday festivities. While these tips may not make Thanksgiving dinner taste any better--they will aid in avoiding potential disaster."


The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) United States Fire Administration (USFA) issued a special report recently examining the characteristics of Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings. The report, Thanksgiving Day Fires in Residential Buildings, was developed by USFA's National Fire Data Center.


The report is based on 2006 to 2008 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS). According to the report, an estimated 2,000 Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings occur annually in the United States, resulting in an estimated average of 5 deaths, 25 injuries, and $21 million in property loss. The leading cause of all Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings is, by far, cooking. Additionally, smoke alarms were not present in 20 percent of nonconfined Thanksgiving Day fires that occurred in occupied residential buildings.



  • Keep your family and overnight guests safe with a working smoke alarm on every level of the house, in each bedroom and in the halls adjacent to the bedrooms. Test smoke alarms monthly, and replace batteries at least once a year.

  • Overnight guests should be instructed on your home’s fire escape plan and designated meeting place for your family.

  • Have a fire extinguisher available not more than 10 feet from the stove, on the exit side of the room.

  • A standard Class ABC multi-purpose dry chemical extinguisher is recommended. Know how to use your fire extinguisher.

  • Start holiday cooking with a clean stove and oven.

  • Keep the kitchen off limits to young children and adults who are not helping with food preparations. This will lessen the possibility of kitchen mishaps.

  • When cooking, do not wear clothing with loose sleeves or dangling jewelry. Clothing can catch on fire and jewelry can become entangled with pot handles, causing spills and burns.

  • Cook on the back burners when possible, and turn pot handles inward so they don’t extend over the edge of the stove.

  • Never leave cooking unattended. If you must leave the kitchen while cooking, turn off the stove or have someone else watch what is being cooked. Unattended cooking is the number one cause of home fires and fire-related injuries in Prince George’s County.  According to the USFA; cooking is the leading cause of all Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings at 69 percent. Nearly all of these cooking fires (97 percent) are small, confined fires with limited damage.

  • If you use a deep fryer, please, exercise extreme caution and follow manufacturer instructions.  The report from the USFA found that these cooking devices accounted for about 1% of Thanksgiving Day fires.
  • Keep Thanksgiving decorations and kitchen clutter away from sources of direct heat.

  • Candles are often part of holiday decorations. They should never be left burning when you are away from home, or after going to bed. Candles should be placed where children will not be tempted to play with them, and where guests will not accidentally brush against them. The candleholder should be completely non-combustible and difficult to knock over. The candle should not have combustible decorations around it.

  • If smoking is allowed inside, provide guests with large, deep ashtrays and check them frequently. After guests leave check inside, under upholstery, and in trash cans for cigarette butts that may be smoldering.
Need a smoke alarm and you live in Prince George's County???

Contact us at 301-864-SAFE (7233) and we will install one for you; free of charge.


The men and women, career and volunteer, of the Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department wish everyone a Happy and Safe Thanksgiving!!!

Three Separate Home Fires Displace 11 Residents

Prince George’s County Firefighters have battled three house fires since yesterday afternoon. These three fires combined in nearly $200,000 in estimated fire loss and 11 family members displaced from their homes. Fortunately, there were no firefighter or civilian injuries reported. All three home fires have been investigated and deemed accidental with the cause being electrical in nature.


At about 4:30 pm, Wednesday, November 17, 2010, firefighters were alerted to a house fire in the 3300 block of Oaklawn Road in Allentown. Firefighters from the Allentown Road Fire/EMS Station 832 arrived quickly at the 1 ½ story single family home and reported fire showing from the top floor. The fire was quickly contained and extinguished. The fire caused an estimated $15,000 in damages. Three residents are displaced and were assisted by other family members.

9700 block of Hummingbird Lane in Upper Marlboro (Steve Stearns)
At about 9:00 pm on Wednesday evening firefighters from the Upper Marlboro area were alerted to a house fire and arrived to find a 2-story single family home in the 9700 block of Hummingbird Lane with heavy fire conditions on the 1st and 2nd floors. Firefighters mounted an aggressive interior attack, however, retreated to the safety of the exterior when conditions inside deteriorated. It required 35 firefighters about 45 minutes to knock down and extinguish the fire. Fire Investigators estimated fire loss at $100,000. Six occupants, including a child and an infant, were displaced and assisted by family members.

300 block of Brockton Road in Oxon Hill (Paul Cruz)
At about 5:30 am, Thursday, November 18, 2010, firefighters from the Oxon Hill area responded to the 300 block of Brockton Road and fought a basement fire in the 1-story single family home. Firefighters were able to quickly contain and extinguish the fire but not before an estimated $75,000 in damages occurred. The two family members are being assisted by the Fire/EMS Departments Citizens Services Unit and the American Red Cross.

Hiring and Testing Process Continues with Candidate Physical Agility Test

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

The job of a Firefighter/Medic is one of the most physically demanding with new recruits never making it through the training academy. Recruits leaving the academy and injuries caused as a result of training cost the County an untold amount of money, not to mention, leaving the recruit class and the Department with a shortage of available personnel. The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department (PGFD) is administering the Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) for the first time as a condition of hire. The hiring process for the position of Fire Fighter/Medic began earlier this year when over 3000 applications were received for a projected 94 positions. A written test and preliminary background checks were performed in August and of those successfully surviving the process so far, there will be approximately 400 candidates provided the opportunity to move on and test at the next level. The Candidate Physical Ability Test measures the capabilities of firefighting recruits along eight job-specific areas.


Previously the Fire/EMS Department used our own version of a physical agility test. PGFD obtained the required license and is requiring successful completion of CPAT for candidates to continue in the hiring process. Fire Fighter/Medic Lieutenant Bill Bussing, the Departments Wellness/Fitness Coordinator, stated, “Through this process we will hire recruits that are physically fit to complete the rigorous demands of the Fire/EMS Training Academy. What we have invested in CPAT will be returned by having recruits being physically fit to do the job while reducing the number of injuries and the drop-out rate from the academy that hurts the Department fiscally.” Additional benefits of CPAT are the protections of a National Standard License that complies with a Federal EEOC conciliation agreement and hiring processes.

Fire Fighter/Medic Katherine Fisher, an instructor at the Fire/EMS Training Academy, stated, “The PGFD will ensure that all candidates are provided full and equal access to the CPAT Conditioning, Orientation, and Timed Practice Run Program to enable the best chance for success when taking the CPAT. During this program, candidates are given the opportunity to view test events, talk with qualified professionals/instructors, and physically examine and use test equipment, tools, and props in a controlled and consistent setting.”

Fire Major Richard M. Lambdin, coordinator of the overall hiring process, stated, "Candidates have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with all elements of CPAT and take advantage of the Physical Fitness and Conditioning Sessions made available to them by PGFD Peer Fitness Trainers and personnel. Participation at these events are highly recommended." The Department offered three CPAT orientation sessions with the first timed CPAT scheduled for mid-late November 2010. The anticipated hire date is the first of the year.

The job of a firefighter /medic is one of the most physically demanding jobs and requires high levels of cardiopulmonary endurance, muscular strength and muscular endurance. The CPAT consists of eight critical physical tasks that simulate actual job duties on the fire ground. This test is physically demanding and requires that candidates be physically fit to be successful. This test is intended to ensure successful candidates are of the highest caliber expected by the citizens of the Prince Georges County who make the significant investment in a Firefighter/Medic’s career. The results are an indication of a lifestyle that further ensures optimal physical performance for life and a career in the fire and emergency medical service in Prince George’s County.

We would like to acknowledge and thank the Anne Arundel County Fire Department and Fire Chief John Ray for allowing us to utilize their CPAT facility in Millersville.

CPAT OVERVIEW

Candidates are given a standard maximum time of 10 minutes, 20 seconds to successfully complete the CPAT. A hard hat, gloves, and 50 pound weight vest are worn throughout every event of CPAT.

Event 1 – Stair Climb

Equipment

This event uses a Step Mill stair-climbing machine. The machine is positioned with one side up against a wall and an elevated proctor platform on the side opposite the wall. A single handrail on the wall side is available for the candidate to grasp while mounting and dismounting the Step Mill. Additional steps are placed at the base of the Step Mill to assist the candidate in mounting the Step Mill.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical tasks of climbing stairs in full protective clothing while carrying a high-rise pack (hose bundle) and climbing stairs in full protective clothing carrying fire fighter equipment. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, lower body muscular endurance and ability to balance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic energy system as well as the following muscle groups: quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, calves, and lower back stabilizers.

Event Description

For this event, the candidate must wear two 12.5-pound weights on the shoulders of the 50 pound weight vest to simulate the weight of a high-rise pack. Prior to the initiation of the timed CPAT, there is a 20-second warm-up on the Step Mill at a set stepping rate of 50 steps per minute. During this warm-up period, the candidate is permitted to dismount, grasp the rail or hold the wall to establish balance and cadence. If a candidate falls or dismounts the Step Mill during the 20-second warm-up period, the candidate must remount the Step Mill and restart the entire 20-second warm-up period. The candidate is allowed to restart the warm-up period twice. The timing of the test begins at the end of this warm-up period when the proctor calls the word “START.” There is no break in time between the warm-up period and the actual timing of the test. For the test, the candidate must walk on the Step Mill at a set stepping rate of 60 steps per minute for three minutes. This concludes the event. The two 12.5-pound weights are removed from the shoulders. Walk 85 feet within the established walkway to the next event.

Event 2 – Hose Drag

Equipment

This event uses an uncharged fire hose with a hose line nozzle. The hose line is marked at 8 feet past the coupling at the nozzle to indicate the maximum amount of hose the candidate is permitted to drape across the shoulder or chest. The hose line is also marked at 50 feet past the coupling at the nozzle to indicate the amount of hose line that the candidate must pull into a marked boundary box before completing the test.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical tasks of dragging an uncharged hose line from the fire apparatus to the fire occupancy and pulling an uncharged hose line around obstacles while remaining stationary. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, lower body muscular strength and endurance, upper back muscular strength and endurance, grip strength and endurance, and anaerobic endurance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, calves, lower back stabilizers, biceps, deltoids, upper back, and muscles of the forearm and hand (grip).

Event

For this event, the candidate must grasp a hose line nozzle attached to 200 feet of 1-3/4 inch hose. Place the hose line over the shoulder or across the chest, not exceeding the 8-foot mark. The candidate is permitted to run during the hose drag. Drag the hose 75-feet to a pre-positioned drum, make a 90-degree turn around the drum, and continue an additional 25 feet. Stop within the marked 5-foot by 7-foot box, drop to at least one knee and pull the hose line until the hose line’s 50-foot mark crosses the finish line. During the hose pull, the candidate must keep at least one knee in contact with the ground and knee(s) must remain within the marked boundary lines.

Event 3 – Equipment Carry

Equipment

This event uses two saws and a tool cabinet replicating a storage cabinet on a fire truck.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical tasks of removing power tools from a fire apparatus, carrying them to the emergency scene and returning the equipment to the fire apparatus. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper body muscular strength and endurance, lower body muscular endurance, grip endurance, and balance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic energy system as well as the following muscle groups: biceps, deltoids, upper back, trapezius, muscles of the forearm and hand (grip), glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings.

Event

For this event, the candidate must remove the two saws from the tool cabinet, one at a time, and place them on the ground. Pick up both saws, one in each hand, and carry them while walking 75 feet around the drum, then back to the starting point. The candidate is permitted to place the saw(s) on the ground to adjust grip. Upon return to the tool cabinet, place the saws on the ground, pick up each saw one at a time, and replace the saw in the designated space in the cabinet.

Event 4 – Ladder Raise and Extension

Equipment

This event uses two 24-foot fire department ladders. For the candidate’s safety, a retractable lanyard is attached to the ladder that the candidate’s raise.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical tasks of placing a ground ladder at a fire structure and extending the ladder to the roof or window. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper body muscular strength, lower body muscular strength, balance, grip strength, and anaerobic endurance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: biceps, deltoids, upper back, trapezius, muscles of the forearm and hand (grip), glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings.

Event

For this event, the candidate must walk to the top rung of the 24-foot aluminum extension ladder, lift the unhinged end from the ground, and walk it up until it is stationary against the wall. This must be done in a hand over hand fashion, using each rung until the ladder is stationary against the wall. The candidate must not use the ladder rails to raise the ladder. Immediately proceed to the pre-positioned and secured 24-foot aluminum extension ladder, stand with both feet within the marked box of 36 inches by 36 inches, and extend the fly section hand over hand until it hits the stop.

Event 5 – Forcible Entry

Equipment

This event uses a mechanized device located 39 inches off the ground that measures cumulative force and a 10-pound sledgehammer.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical tasks of using force to open a locked door or to breach a wall. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper body muscular strength and endurance, lower body muscular strength and endurance, balance, grip strength and endurance, and anaerobic endurance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: quadriceps, glutes, triceps, upper back, trapezius, and muscles of the forearm and hand (grip).

Event

For this event, the candidate must use a 10-pound sledgehammer to strike the measuring device in the target area until the buzzer is activated. During this event, candidates must keep their feet outside the toe-box at all times.

Event 6 – Search

Equipment

This event uses an enclosed search maze that has obstacles and narrowed spaces.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical task of searching for a fire victim with limited visibility in an unpredictable area. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper body muscular strength and endurance, agility, balance, anaerobic endurance, and kinesthetic awareness. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: muscles of the chest, shoulder, triceps, quadriceps, abdominals, and lower back.

Event

For this event, the candidate must crawl through a tunnel maze that is approximately 3 feet high, 4 feet wide and 64 feet in length with two 90-degree turns. At a number of locations in the tunnel, the candidate must navigate around, over, and under obstacles. In addition, at two locations, the candidate must crawl through a narrowed space where the dimensions of the tunnel are reduced. The candidate’s movement is monitored through a narrowed space where the dimensions of the tunnel are reduced. The candidate’s movement is monitored through the maze. If for any reason, the candidate chooses to end the event, the candidate may call out or rap sharply on the wall or ceiling and the candidate will be assisted out of the maze.

Event 7 – Rescue

Equipment

This event uses a weighted mannequin equipped with a harness and shoulder handles.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical task of removing a victim or injured partner from a fire scene. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper and lower body muscular strength and endurance, grip strength and endurance, and anaerobic endurance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, abdominals, torso rotators, lower back stabilizers, trapezius, deltoids, latissimus dorsi, biceps, and muscles of the forearm and hand (grip).

Event

For this event, the candidate must grasp a 165-pound mannequin by the handle(s) on the shoulder(s) of the harness (either one or both handles are permitted), drag it 35 feet to a pre-positioned drum, make a 180 degree turn around the drum, and continue an additional 35 feet to the finish line. The candidate is not permitted to grasp or rest on the drum. It is permissible for the mannequin to touch the drum. Candidates are permitted to drop and release the mannequin and adjust their grip. The entire mannequin must be dragged until it crosses the marked finish line.

Event 8 – Ceiling Breach and Pull

Equipment

This event uses a mechanized device that measures overhead push and pull forces and a pike pole. The pike pole is a commonly used piece of equipment that consists of a 6-foot long pole with a hook and a point attached to one end.

Purpose of Event

This event is designed to simulate the critical task of breaching and pulling down a ceiling to check for fire extension. This event challenges the candidate’s aerobic capacity, upper and lower body muscular strength and endurance, grip strength and endurance, and anaerobic endurance. This event affects the candidate’s aerobic and anaerobic energy systems as well as the following muscle groups: quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, abdominals, torso rotators, lower back stabilizers, deltoids, trapezius, triceps, biceps, and muscles of the forearm and hand (grip).

Event

For this event, the candidate must remove the pike pole from the bracket, stand within the boundary established by the equipment frame, and place the tip of the pole on the painted area of the hinged door in the ceiling. Fully push up the 60-pound hinged door in the ceiling with the pike pole three times. Then, hook the pike pole to the 80-pound ceiling device and pull the pike pole down five times. Each set consists of three pushes and five pulls. Repeat the set four times. Candidates are permitted to stop and, if needed, adjust their grip. Releasing the grip or allowing the pike pole handle to slip, without the pike pole falling to the ground, does not result in a warning or constitute a failure. Candidates are permitted to re-establish their grip and resume the event. If the candidate does not successfully complete a repetition, the proctor calls out “MISS” and the candidate must push or pull the apparatus again to complete the repetition. This event and the total test time end when the candidate completes the final pull stroke repetition as indicated by a proctor who calls out “TIME.”


Event 1 – Stair Climb

Event 2 – Hose Drag


Event 5 – Forcible Entry


Instructor explains Event 6 – Search



 


Event 7 – Rescue



Event 3 – Equipment Carry



Event 6 – Search



Event 8 – Ceiling Breach and Pull




Instructor demonstrates Event 5 – Forcible Entry






Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Gaylord Resort Attraction is Cold and Safe

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930 mebrady@co.pg.md.us

The Prince George's County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Departments Office of the Fire Marshall and local firefighters conducted a Life Safety Inspection and walk through of the Gaylord National Resort as they gear up for their Christmas on the Potomac. This holiday attraction will open to the public on November 18, 2010, and includes events inside the hotel atrium and a separate event that includes over 2-million pounds of ICE. Fire Inspectors and the crew from the first due station conducted the inspections and walk-thru of both venues located at the National Harbor in Oxon Hill on Monday, November 15, 2010.


Fire Inspectors Hoover, Yancy and Watkins observe
pyrotechnics deployed inside the atrium.
Fire Inspectors Mark Hoover, Ray Hinkle, Keith Yancy and Cassandra Watkins were joined by personnel from Oxon Hill Fire/EMS Station 842, under the leadership of Fire Fighter/Medic Captain John Elie, started their inspection in the atrium of the Gaylord Hotel. The 2010 Christmas on the Potomac includes a 60-foot glass Tree of Light, indoor snowfalls nightly, 2 million twinkling lights and a show including pyrotechnics. The inspection included a review of the pyrotechnics display and areas where patrons will be allowed to gather and observe as well as other items.



A second inspection was conducted at a nearby site that includes a tent that houses displays crafted of ice. The Gaylord Resorts signature winter holiday attraction brings to life a 1957 Dr. Seuss holiday classic. Sculpted from TWO-MILLION pounds of ice, the indoor walk-through attraction brilliantly showcases how the “Whoville-hating” Grinch, with a heart two sizes too small, learns the true meaning of Christmas. Last year’s event attracted thousands of visitors.

Throughout the morning long inspection it was apparent that Gaylord Resorts went to great lengths to ensure the safety of everyone involved.

Fire Captain Elie stated, “A walk through and inspection allows firefighters and medics an opportunity to become familiar with the venue and discuss pre-plans in the event of an emergency. This is an elaborate display that uses tons of ice, temperatures inside the tent at 9 degrees with thousands of people in attendance and we need to be prepared to handle any incident that may occur.”

The crew from Oxon Hill #842 are briefed by Fire Inspector Mark Hoover inside the Gaylord Hotel atrium.

 
A small puff of smoke rises after a percussion device was deployed.

Fire Inspector Hinkle, Fire Captain Elie, Fire Inspector Hoover and a representative
of Gaylord discuss the events scheduled inside the atrium.


Fire Inspectors observe a green flame generated using methane gas.

Fire Inspector Hinkle, Fire Fighter/Medic Polimeni and a Gaylord representative tour the ICE display.

In the interest of public safety and injury prevention; Fire Fighter/Medic Captain Elie volunteered to test the ice slide.

Captain Elie after the ice slide indicated it was safe (and fun).

Fire Inspectors Hoover, Yancy and Watkins during the tour of the ICE display.

The crew from Oxon Hill Fire/EMS Station #842 observe the ice skating rink as part of their walk through.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Clinton House Fire - Five Firefighters Sustained Minor Injuries

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

Five Prince George’s County Firefighters sustained minor injuries while battling a fierce fire at a Clinton house this morning. At about 11:15 am, Wednesday, November 10, 2010, fire/EMS units responded to 8200 Anaio Court after being alerted of a house on fire. Firefighters arrived to find a 2-story single family home with heavy fire conditions on both floors with fire extending into the attic area. The house is vacant, however, is known to have recently housed vagrants. Firefighters conducted a primary search of the structure before vacating and continued to extinguish the fire from the safety of the exterior.


It required 33 firefighters about 30 minutes to knock down the bulk of the fire. Four firefighters sustained minor burns and one firefighter sustained an injury to his leg; all were transported to area medical facilities, treated and released.

The cause of the fire is under investigation and fire loss estimates are not yet available.




PEPCO DONATES SMOKE ALARMS

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

The citizens and residents of Prince George's County received a potential life-saving donation from PEPCO this morning. Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones accepted 2000 smoke alarms and hearing impaired smoke alarms donated by PEPCO at the Cranford-Graves Fire Services Building in Landover Hills. Pete Pedersen, Coordinator of PEPCO's Emergency Service Partnership Program, and Kim Watson, Vice-President of Government Affairs/Maryland Division, were on-hand to make the presentation to the Department.


Citizens and residents can call the Departments’ Smoke Alarm Hotline at 301-864-SAFE (7233) and request a smoke alarm. A Fire/EMS Department representative will install a smoke alarm in your home; free of charge.

Video is courtesy of Jeff Callaway, PGFD Community Outreach/PIO
Photos by Mark E. Brady, PGFD PIO



Pete Pedersen (PEPCO), Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones, and Kim Watson (PEPCO) at smoke alarm donation

Monday, November 8, 2010

Life Saving Education Provided

A reminder to provide fresh batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is a staple of public fire education and safety programs. A natural reminder to perform this important act occurs twice a year when clocks are adjusted to reflect Daylight Saving Time and Standard Time changes. Firefighters strongly participate in the November reminder as the likelihood of fire increases with cold weather and we know the critical role alarms play in protecting you and your family.

In addition to a media campaign, Prince Georges County Firefighter/Medics hit the street yesterday going door-to-door throughout communities and greeting citizen and residents at shopping centers providing a reminder that when you change your clock to change your batteries as well.

Under the command of the on-duty Operations Chief, Major Dennis Wood, fire/EMS personnel visited 2,700 homes and 10,000 personal contacts were made on Sunday, November 7, 2010, providing life saving information about the importance of smoke and CO alarms as well as having a home escape plan.

For additional information on obtaining a smoke alarm installed in your house, free of charge, call 301-864-SAFE (7233).
Mark E. Brady

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Firefighters Rescue Man Trapped in Burning Home

Firefighters arrived at the 1-story single family Lanham home with heavy smoke showing and had received reports that one occupant was trapped inside.

At about 10:30 pm, Friday, November 5, 2010, firefighter/medics searched and fought a fierce blaze at the home in the 6400 block of Princess Garden Parkway.
Public Safety Communications Dispatchers had relayed information to responding units that a 70ish year old male was unable to escape the home and was still inside.

As a team of firefighters stretched hoselines and battled the fire, another team searched for the trapped occupant. Through the blinding smoke and intense heat Firefighter/Medic William Vanarsdale, assigned to the Landover Hills Fire/EMS Station, located the man in a bedroom. Vanarsdale was assisted by Bladensburg Volunteer Fire Fighter Schultz in removing the man to the exterior.

Paramedics tended to the injured man, suffering from smoke and thermal injuries, and was quickly transported to an area Burn Unit in serious condition.

Firefighters continued to battle the blaze for about 30 minutes before knocking the fire down.

Fire Investigators continue to search for the cause of the fire that remains under investigation. Fire loss is estimated at $100,000.

Two other occupants of the home were able to escape prior to firefighters arrival. They were assisted by the Departments Citizen Services Unit and the Red Cross.


Mark E. Brady

Friday, November 5, 2010

MEDIA ADVISORY - SMOKE ALARM DONATION

MEDIA ADVISORY
For Immediate Release
Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

One of the most effective tools firefighters have to protect you is a working smoke alarm. Prince George’s County Firefighters remain active in communities testing smoke alarms and installing new ones if needed. Our free smoke alarm program would not be possible if it were not for the generous donation of smoke alarms from PEPCO.

PEPCO’s Emergency Services Partnership Program has donated thousands of smoke alarms over the past several years and is prepared to do so again. We invite you to join Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones, members of the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department and officials from PEPCO when this donation is made.

WHAT: Smoke Alarm Donation

WHEN: Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 11:00 am

WHERE: Cranford-Graves Fire Services Building, 6820 Webster Street, Landover Hills, MD
Weather permitting; we will hold this event outside in front of the Fallen Firefighters Memorial.

WHO: Fire/EMS Department personnel including Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones and Officials from PEPCO’s Emergency Services Partnership Program.

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Apparatus Departmental

Just after 8:00 pm the heavy-duty rescue Squad from Morningside Fire/EMS Station was involved in a motor vehicle crash with a civilian vehicle. The crash occurred at Allentown Road and Auth Place.

One civilian and five firefighters were transported to area hospitals for treatment of minor injuries.

The County Police Department are investigating the incident. No further information is available at this time.
Mark E. Brady

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

MVC Involving a Vehicle in Water with Patient Entrapment - UPDATE

Three Good Samaritans, all Criminal Justice students from the Anne Arundel Community College, are credited with saving the life of a man that was involved in a crash and was drowning.


At about 6:45 pm, Tuesday, November 2, 2010, a vehicle left the roadway, ran through a fence, rolled several times down an embankment and landed on the left side of the vehicle in a large collection pond. The collection pond is about 3 to 4 feet deep and is centered between Annapolis Road (Route 450) and Martin Luther King Highway (Route 704) in Lanham. The driver, a male in his 20’s, was ejected during the rollover and ended up being trapped under the vehicle with his body under water and the vehicle on top of him. A passenger in the vehicle was able to escape unharmed.

The two men and a female Good Samaritans stopped at the scene after witnessing the incident and without hesitation or fear of their own safety; two of them entered the water. The third Good Samaritan stayed out of the water and contacted 911 on a cell phone. The pair found the victim unconscious and underwater. They were able to lift the victim’s upper body and supported his head and shoulders above the water until Firefighters and Paramedics arrived on the scene.

Firefighters and paramedics encountered a challenging extrication while partially submerged and patient removal. They used their Hurst Tool (Jaws of Life) to lift the Mercury Mountaineer SUV just enough to remove the vehicles weight off of the victim. A winch on the Glenn Dale Heavy Duty Rescue Squad was used to roll the vehicle completely off. The patient was then removed up the steep embankment to awaiting paramedics. The rescue operation took about 30 minutes.

Paramedics evaluated the patient and determined he had lost consciousness, ingested water into his lungs and sustained unknown trauma during the rollover and ejection. The adult male was transported to a nearby Trauma Center in critical condition. The Prince George’s County Police Department is investigating the crash.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

Several MVC's along Route 301 and Route 5 in Brandywine

There have been 4 motor vehicle crashes over a 2-day period; November 1 and 2, 2010, resulting in a fatality, 3 traumas and 4 injuries. These incidents occurred along the Route 301 and Route 5 corridor near Brandywine Road in Brandywine.  There has been 1 fatality and 3 patients flown to area trauma centers and 4 other patients taken to area hospitals by paramedics.

November 1, 2010 - 4:00 pm - SB Route 301 near Brandywine Road - 1 trauma fly out
* November 2, 2010 - 3:30 pm - On Route 301 (14000 block) near Brandywine Road - 1 trauma fly out
* November 2, 2010 - 3:45 pm - on Route 301 (13300 block) - 1 trauma fly out -
* Two separate incidents had 4 additional transports by EMS to area hospitals between both incidents.
November 2, 2010 - 8:15 pm - Route 5 near Brandywine Road - 1 fatality

Please contact the investigating law enforcement agency for additional information and details.

Monday, November 1, 2010

Change Your Clock - Change Your Battery - SIMPLE AND FREE

 MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

Each year the men and women of the Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services Department seek the assistance of our friends in the media in our campaign to save lives and limit property damage by promoting working smoke alarms.

Twice a year we promote our campaign that when citizens and residents change their clock for or to end Daylight Savings Time that they also change their battery in their smoke and CO alarms. It is especially important in the Fall when cold weather is upon us and the possibility of fire increases as everyone tries to stay warm.

Daylight Savings Time will end on Sunday, November 7, 2010. Please remind our citizens and residents to provide their alarms with a fresh battery in their smoke and CO alarms as well.

• Having a working smoke alarm increase the chances of surviving a fire by 50%

• No smoke alarms were present in 43% of the home fire deaths.

• In 22% of the home fire deaths, smoke alarms were present but did not sound.

• An estimated 890 lives could be saved each year if all homes had working smoke alarms!

The Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department, as well as every Department in the National Capital Region, has a free smoke alarm program. Simply call our smoke alarm hotline at 301-864-SAFE (7233) and a firefighter will come to your house and install a smoke alarm; FREE OF CHARGE!!! You can also apply on-line by clicking here.

It’s a Law we can live with!!! In Prince George’s County residents are required to have at least one working smoke alarm in your home. The Fire/EMS Department recommends you have one on every level of your home and if you sleep with your bedroom door closed; have a working smoke alarm installed in your bedroom as well.

Also;

Test your smoke alarm every month by pushing the test button.

Change the battery in your alarm at least once-a-year.

Clean your smoke alarm on a regular basis with a clean rag or vacuum.

Replace your smoke alarm if it is more than 10 years old.

Former Member Appointed to NFPA Position

The Prince George’s County, Maryland, Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department congratulates retired member Gregory B. Cade on his recent appointment.


Cade served the citizens and residents of Prince George’s County for 24 years in various capacities while working his way up the ranks to the position of Assistant Fire Chief upon his retirement. He subsequently served as chief for the City of Hampton Division of Fire/Rescue in Hampton, Va. and the City of Virginia Beach Fire Department in Virginia Beach, Va. Cade was appointed United States Fire Administrator in 2007, where he served as the country’s top fire official until January of 2009. Cade most recently was assistant director of National Programs for the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC). He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Fire Science from the University of Maryland.

James M. Shannon, president of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), recently announced on October 6, 2010, the appointment of Gregory B. Cade as division director of Government Affairs. He will oversee NFPA’s Washington office.

“Greg brings more than 40 years experience from a line firefighter to United States Fire Administrator to this position,” said Shannon. “We are extremely pleased to have such an esteemed fire professional lead our efforts in Washington.”

Prince George’s County Fire Chief Eugene A. Jones stated, “Congratulations to Chief Cade on his appointment with the NFPA and for a prestigious and honorable fire service career. He is honoring the tradition of many talented members of our Department continuing to lead the fire service after their departure. Their commitment continues at a higher level.”