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Thursday, November 29, 2012

Lanham House Fire - Naval Avenue (UPDATED)

Firefighters battled a fire in a Lanham home on Thursday evening that injured two firefighters and displaced the family.

At around 9:30 pm, Thursday, firefighters responded to the 6300 block of Naval Avenue at the intersection of Hickory Hill Avenue and encountered a 2-story single family home with fire on both floors.

After about 15 minutes of fighting the fire a Task Force was sounded bringing additional Fire/EMS resources to the scene. The fire was extinguished just after 10:00 pm.

Two firefighters sustained similar burn injuries and were transported to a Burn Unit with small burns to their back and neck area.  Burning embers fell from above and burned through their protective nomex hood before making contact with their neck and back. Both firefighters were treated and released.

The cause of the fire is under investigation with preliminary reports indicating the cause is "accidental." Fire loss is estimated at $150,000.

The family, 1 adult and 2 children, were at home at the time of the fire and escaped safely. They will be displaced as a result of the fire damage. The Red Cross is providing assistance to the family.

  





ICE at Gaylord National Extends Hero Night Discount


Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Upper Marlboro Fire with Death - Investigation Continues


                    MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
Prince Georges County Fire Investigators have wrapped up their on-scene investigation of a fire that occurred early this morning in Upper Marlboro.

Around 2:15 am, Wednesday, firefighters were alerted to a structure fire in the 15000 block of Buck Lane in Upper Marlboro. The structure, which appeared to be an abandoned house, was well involved with fire upon arrival. Exterior operations commenced until the fire was knocked down.

After about 45 minutes of battling the blaze the bulk of the fire was extinguished and firefighters entered the burned out shell for overhaul and to wet down small hot spots that were still smoldering. During this process a body was discovered. The body is un-identifiable. An autopsy will be required to determine the identity and cause of death.

County Police Homicide Detectives, as a matter of standard operating procedure whenever a fatality is involved, joined Fire Investigators in the investigation. The cause of the fire will remain undetermined until a cause of death can be confirmed by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. While the investigation remains open and on-going, Fire Investigators have not found anything suspicious, however, must await autopsy results before coming to a conclusion.

The on-scene investigation did yield evidence that the abandoned home was being used by homeless, squatters or vagrants.

The Investigation remains open and on-going.

Alarms to be Installed in Community Plagued by CO Incidents

                         MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930

Carbon Monoxide is referred to by first responders as the “silent killer.” If your home is not protected by a working carbon monoxide (CO) detector then it is impossible to detect if your house is filling up with the potentially deadly gas. CO is invisible and has no odor and the only way a home occupant can determine if there are unhealthy levels in their home is to have a working CO detector.


The Southlawn community in Oxon Hill has been one of the hardest affected areas by CO. Five occupants of a home were overcome by CO and died earlier this year. Another home recently had unhealthy levels of CO that required hospitalization for the occupants. As temperatures continue to fall and winter fast approaching, staying warm becomes a priority. Unfortunately, staying warm, if not done safely, could be a fire and health concern.

Prince George’s County Council Member Obie Patterson - District 8 is stepping up efforts to ensure homes and families are protected from the perils of fire and carbon monoxide. His office has obtained smoke alarms and CO detectors that will be installed in homes throughout District 8. Council Member Patterson will work with Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor and the personnel of the Fire/EMS Department to go door-to-door in the Southlawn community to check on homes and ensure they are safe. Firefighters will perform a visual inspection of furnace areas and ventilation pipes and provide safety information and advice. A combination smoke and CO alarm will be installed in homes that need them – at no cost.

WHAT: Kick-Off of Council Member Patterson’s Safe Homes Campaign

WHEN: Friday, November 30, 2012, 1:00 pm

WHERE: Westfield Drive and Haven Avenue -  Oxon Hill, MD

WHO: County Council Member Obie Patterson – District 8, Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor, Firefighter and Paramedics, residents and staff from District 8.

Ask Tony and Tucker - FOX 5 DC Morning News

DC Breaking Local News Weather Sports FOX 5 WTTG

Fire and Police Investigate Upper Marlboro Fire Incident After Body is Discovered - Buck Lane

Prince Georges County Fire Investigators and Police Homicide Detectives are conducting a joint investigation into the circumstances involving a deceased person being discovered after a fire was extinguished in an Upper Marlboro abandoned structure early this morning.

Around 2:15 am, Wednesday, firefighters were alerted to a structure fire in the 15000 block of Buck Lane in Upper Marlboro. The structure, which appeared to be an abandoned house, was well involved with fire upon arrival. Exterior operations commenced until the fire was knocked down.

After about 45 minutes of battling the blaze the bulk of the fire was extinguished and firefighters entered the burned out shell for overhaul and to wet down the small hot spots that were still smouldering. During this process a body was discovered. The body is un-identifiable. An autopsy will be required to determine the identity and cause of death.

Due to personnel operating in close vicinity of CSX tracks all train traffic was stopped. Largo Road (RT 202) was also closed due to hose lines in the roadway.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Mark Brady
PGFD PIO






Monday, November 26, 2012

John Gonzalez, WJLA, Reports on rash of recent fires

Lauren DeMarco, Fox 5 DC, Reports on 3-Alarm New Carrollton Apartment Fire

DC Breaking Local News Weather Sports FOX 5 WTTG

Brad Bell, WJLA News, Report on PGFD Fires

Oxon Hill Fire Victim Identified

Media Contact: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930

The Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department has released the identity of the man that succumbed to injuries sustained on early Sunday morning, November 25, 2012.  The man has been identified as Douglas Williams, 59 years-of-age, DOB 2-12-53, of Oxon Hill, MD.  Fire Investigators have concluded the house fire in the 5100 block of Boulder Drive was "accidental" in nature.

Witnesses reported that after the fire started, Mr. Williams rescued his wife and escorted her to safety before returning inside the burning home where he fell unconscious and was located by firefighters near the area of the kitchen/dining room.

Prince George's County Firefighters returned to the community on Sunday afternoon and Monday morning to go door-to-door providing fire safety information and offering to check smoke alarms. Firefighters also answered questions that neighbors had about the incident.









UPDATED - Apartment Building Fire - 85th Avenue

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us








Prince George's County Firefighters battled a New Carrolton apartment building fire this afternoon that escalated to 3 Alarms of personnel and apparatus.

At around 1:00 pm, Monday, numerous 911 calls were received reporting an apartment fire at 5312 85th Avenue in the Sutton Walk apartment complex. This is a garden style apartment building with 3 stories in the front and 4 stories in the rear of the building.

Firefighters arrived to find heavy fire showing from the top two floors. It appears all civilians had evacuated safely prior to the fire department arrival. The fire extended into the attic area where firefighters were successful in stopping the extension into adjoining apartment buildings. A 2nd Alarm was sounded bringing additional Fire/EMS units and personnel to the scene to assist in battling the fire. It required fifty firefighters 30 minutes to knock down the bulk of the fire. A precautionary 3rd Alarm was sounded and staged nearby in the event they were needed.

Two firefighters sustained a minor burn injuries and were transported to the Burn Unit at Medstar Washington Hospital Center where it is expected both will be treated and released.

The cause of the fire has been ruled "accidental" and attributed to a malfunctioning natural gas stove in a 2nd floor apartment.  Fire loss is estimated at $750,000. There are a total of 43 apartments that may be affected by the fire and a lack of utilities.  A minimum of 11 apartments in the building of origin will be uninhabitable from fire, heat, smoke and water damage. Two attached buildings may also suffer displacement due to a lack of utilities.  The County Citizen Services Unit is on the scene working with apartment complex management in providing assistance to the displaced residents.
















Sunday, November 25, 2012

Sunday Incident Updates

It is with deep sadness the the Fire/EMS Department announce that the adult male, 50 years of age, that was pulled out of his burning Oxon Hill home by firefighters this morning succumbed to his injuries early this afternoon. He was at Medstar Washington Hospital Center Burn Unit. The name is being withheld pending notification of family. The preliminary cause of the fire is listed as "accidental."

The fire on Van Buren Street in Hyattsville started on the exterior of the house in the area of the heat pump/HVAC unit. The fire spread to the homes interior and caused significant damage to both homes in the duplex. No injuries occurred. Two occupants from one side of the duplex and eleven occupants from the other side are displaced and either assisted by the Red Cross or made their own living arrangements.


Mark Brady
PGFD Chief Spokesperson
TEXT-2405087930


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Oxon Hill House Fire - Boulder Drive

Just before 5:30 Sunday morning firefighters in the Oxon Hill area were alerted to a house on fire with someone still trapped inside. Firefighters arrived to a one-story single family home in the 5100 block of Boulder Drive with heavy smoke showing.

An adult male occupant, approximately 50 years of age, was quickly located in the home and removed. Paramedics quickly assessed and started to treat the patient who was suffering from burn and smoke inhalation injuries. He was transported by medics to the closest available hospital in extremely critical condition.

The wife of the critically injured man was also transported a short time later after experiencing symptoms of smoke inhalation. She was transported by medics to the same hospital in "fair" condition.

There were 30 firefighters on the scene that took about 15 minutes to extinguish the fire. No firefighter injuries were reported.

Fire Investigators are looking into the cause and origin of the fire. Preliminary information indicates a kerosene space heater is involved and fire loss is estimated at $50,000.

Prince George's County Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor will be available on the scene this morning at 9:00 am. He will provide the most up-to-date information about the fire and injuries.

Mark Brady
PGFD PIO


This E-mail and any of its attachments may contain Prince George's
County Government or Prince George's County 7th Judicial Circuit
Court proprietary information or Protected Health Information,
which is privileged and confidential. This E-mail is intended
solely for the use of the individual or entity to which it is
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this E-mail,
you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution,
copying, or action taken in relation to the contents of and
attachments to this E-mail is strictly prohibited by federal law
and may expose you to civil and/or criminal penalties. If you have
received this E-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately
and permanently delete the original and any copy of this E-mail and
any printout.

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Two Fires Usher in Thanksgiving Day


Media Contact: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930, mebrady@co.pg.md.us

Prince George’s County Firefighters battled a Laurel house fire and a Suitland fast food restaurant overnight.

Laurel house fire started accidentally while occupants were smoking a
turkey on the rear deck. (PGFD PHOTO)

The first fire broke out just before 11:00 pm, Wednesday, November 21, as occupants were smoking a turkey.  Fire Investigators believe the occupants were preparing the Thanksgiving turkey on a propane grill located on the rear deck of the house in the 500 block of Prince George Street in Laurel.  The fire initially started on the homes exterior and eventually spread into the 2-story single family home.  The home was declared unsafe and the occupants were displaced.  Fire loss is estimated at $100,000.  One firefighter suffered an illness on the scene and transported to a local hospital for treatment.

Firefighters battle a restaurant fire on Allentown Road in Suitland. (PGFD PHOTO)

The second fire occurred just after midnight on Thursday.  Firefighters were alerted to a building fire at 5001 Allentown Road in Suitland.  Fire/EMS units arrived to find a 1-story, stand alone, fast food restaurant with heavy fire showing.  At the height of the incident firefighters had to evacuate the interior due to the amount of fire involving the roof and fear of a collapse.  The bulk of the fire was knocked down from the exterior before firefighters re-entered and completed the extinguishment. Forty firefighters needed just over an hour to extinguish the fire.  The fire caused approximately $250,000 in fire loss.  No injuries were reported.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.

We hope the remainder of Thanksgiving Day is uneventful for firefighters and paramedics.  Remember, cooking fires far exceed any other cause of fires on Thanksgiving.  We wish everyone a Happy and Safe Thanksgiving and it is our sincerest hope that we don’t meet by accident.

Monday, November 19, 2012

THE DIAMONDBACK - CP EMS prepare for silent nights, nonstop calls

This story was posted today in THE DIAMONDBACK - The University of Maryland's Independent student newspaper.  See the story on their website by clicking here.



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CP EMS prepare for silent nights, nonstop calls

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  • Expecting the unexpected

    EMS employees are prepared for all types of nights, ranging from silent, calm ones with few or no calls to those that are nonstop. Preceptor Rich Donohue (left), an 11-year veteran, said work is usually calm while the bars are still open and the department tends to have its craziest calls after they close.
Posted: Monday, November 19, 2012 12:25 am | Updated: 12:50 am, Mon Nov 19, 2012.
It’s a relatively calm and routine Saturday night with the College Park EMS team. The bars are still open, meaning things probably won’t pick up for a couple more hours.
Preceptor Rich Donohue, an 11-year department veteran, is working overtime with the College Park station instead of his usual District Heights team. He’s showing intern Kyle Hastings the ropes — an easy task, he says, because Hastings already has years of experience — but then, there’s a call about a small child having a seizure.
The unit sets out. Medical supplies line the shelves of the ambulance, rattling around during a particularly bumpy ride.
“Some people drive really bad,” Donohue jokes. “Makes you want to throw up back there.”
When paramedics are inside the ambulance, they see hardly a sliver of the outside world, other than the small rear window that provides little directional information. There’s no reason to focus anywhere else.
By the time they arrive on the scene, there’s already another ambulance there. Donohue takes charge on arrival as he consoles the frantic, crying child while recording medical history from the child’s mother. He performs his tasks seamlessly.
Donohue has a soft spot for kids. He has young children of his own, so calming and taking care of them is second nature.
“They’re always going to be scared in the beginning. A 3- or 4-year-old won’t answer you, but they’ll look you in the eyes,” he said. “That tugs at my heart.”
Within a few minutes, the chaos surrounding the scene has calmed, and the child sleeps on the way to the hospital. Seizures consume energy, Hastings says, leaving the person exhausted and in dire need of rest.
Hastings puts in a call to a local hospital to make sure the child can be treated there. Upon arrival, Donohue and Hastings brief the hospital emergency room staff on the child’s condition. Hardly a few minutes pass before a helicopter lands to bring another patient through.
Once the hospital has all of the information, there isn’t much the paramedics can do. But Donohue likes to check on patients before he leaves, and Hastings still has some paperwork to finish before the unit heads out, awaiting the next call.
After the first call, the night slows down. The ride home is much smoother.
Back at the station, a map of Prince George’s County that includes all of the calls and priorities is projected onto a screen, while college football plays on another. There isn’t much going on right now, so EMS employees complete some paperwork, take care of some restocking and do a host of other housekeeping tasks that continually get pushed aside in the unpredictability of each day.
Some days are nonstop. But on others, Donohue works for eight hours without a single call.
“It will start picking up when the bars close,” he said. “There’s enough to do [in the meantime].”
These are the times when crazy calls come in, he said. When he worked for the fire service, Donohue remembers being called to help pump a flooded basement one night and seeing former Redskins quarterback Mark Rypien at the scene of a car accident on another.
College Park is much quieter than Donohue’s normal station in District Heights, where he is more likely to respond to a drug call than a drunken student. Both are equally rewarding to him, but there is a comfort in knowing the streets he patrols well.
There’s enough time to watch the halftime show and part of the third quarter of a college football game before dispatch notifies the station of another incident. Information is printed off, and the unit is on call again.
An elderly woman is having difficulty breathing, and the unit rattles along to her house. A family member’s hairspray had irritated the woman’s lungs. Donohue talks to family members to get a feel for the situation, while Hastings administers medical tests and gives the woman oxygen.
Once she regains her breath, Hastings asks the woman if she wants to be transported to the hospital. She declines, so the unit heads back to the station to wait for the next call.
Both calls on the slow night were routine, but it doesn’t matter. Donohue loves the job because of its unpredictable nature, he said. Some nights are slow and routine, while others are action-packed — far from the typical 9-to-5 job, he added. Maybe there wasn’t a lot to do, but to Donohue, it was a successful night.
“I’d call anything a success if they’re alive at the end,” he said. “As long as you didn’t get worse, then it’s a success.”