@PGFDPIO Twitter

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Flash Flood Watch This Afternoon into Late Tonight - Safety Info


MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a Flash Flood Watch for Prince George’s County and surrounding jurisdictions from this afternoon at 1:00 pm through late tonight.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STATEMENT


Flash Flood Watch

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
349 AM EDT THU JUL 3 2014

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM 1 PM EDT THIS AFTERNOON
THROUGH LATE TONIGHT...

* FROM 1 PM EDT THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH LATE TONIGHT

* TROPICAL MOISTURE WILL REMAIN OVER THE AREA THROUGH TONIGHT.  SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ARE LIKELY...ESPECIALLY LATE THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH LATE TONIGHT. RAINFALL RATES IN HEAVIER SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS MAY EXCEED 2 INCHES PER HOUR.

* IN TARGETED AREAS THAT RECEIVE TORRENTIAL RAIN FOR LONGER THAN 30 MINUTES...FLASH FLOODING MAY BEGIN QUICKLY AND IN A VERY LOCALIZED AREA. BE AWARE OF LOW AREAS THAT MAY FLOOD. NEVER CROSS ROADS THAT ARE FLOODED. TURN AROUND DON'T DROWN.


Precautionary/preparedness actions: A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation. Be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

Flash Flood Facts...

Flash floods occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall or a dam failure. Flooding is a longer-term event and may last a week or more.

Most flash flooding is caused by (1) slow-moving thunderstorms, (2) thunder-storms repeatedly moving over the same area or (3) heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms.

Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, and destroy buildings and bridges.

Densely populated areas have a high risk for flash floods. The construction of buildings, highways, driveways, and parking lots increases runoff by reducing the amount of rain absorbed by the ground.

Water can erode the roadbed creating unsafe driving conditions.

Many flash floods occur at night when flooded roads are hard to see.

2 feet of water will float your car, truck or SUV!!! 6 inches of fast-moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.

Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are auto related. If your car stalls, leave it and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely.

Underpasses can fill rapidly with water, while the adjacent roadway remains clear. Driving into a flooded underpass can quickly put you in 5-6 feet of water.

The Prince George's County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department wants you to stay safe during this potentially dangerous weather conditions.  Help us by helping yourself and heed warnings and safety tips.


Flash Flood Safety Tips...

Never try to walk, swim, or drive through swift-moving floodwater. Remember, 2 feet of water will float your vehicle and 6 inches of fast moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.

If you come upon floodwaters, STOP, TURN AROUND AND GO ANOTHER WAY!!

Do not attempt to drive through a flooded road.

If your car stalls in high water, DON'T PANIC, leave your car and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely and call 911.

Stay informed about the storm and possible flooding by listening to your NOAA weather radio, commercial radio or television.

STAY INFORMED - STAY READY - STAY SAFE!!!

Flash Flooding occurred here.  A car stranded in high water on Paint Branch Parkway in College Park in June 2014.  Don't Panic!!!  Seek higher ground or await public safety assistance on the roof of your car.






Message From County Executive Rushern L. Baker About the Passing of Wayne K. Curry


This message is sent on behalf of County Executive Rushern L. Baker, III
 
Good Afternoon Colleagues,
 
I am sure that many of you have heard of our County’s tremendous loss yesterday in the passing of Former County Executive Wayne K. Curry, a great leader, visionary, and friend.  He recently announced that he had been diagnosed with lung cancer yet he valiantly fought this battle as he did so many others during his accomplished life.  Please click on the link below and you will find a statement I released yesterday as well as a video tribute to him that was released in February 2014. 
 
In honor and memory of Wayne K. Curry’s passing, and in accordance with the Flag Protocol, the County flag has been lowered and will remain lowered until the day of his internment.
 
Wayne K. Curry meant a great deal to this County and to his family.  I ask that you keep his family and loved ones in your thoughts and prayers.
 
As information becomes available regarding funeral arrangements, we will share it with you.
 
Link to County Executive Rushern L. Baker’s Statement
 
Sincerely,
 
Rushern L. Baker, III
County Executive

Top Ten Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

One of the most important tips to remember while planning a trip to enjoy a local fireworks display; Leave your pets at home.  I would like to share the Top 10 Fourth of July Safety Tips from the website www.petmd.com and hope you love your pet enough to leave them at home with a TV or radio left on loud enough to cover up nearby sounds of fireworks.  Have a Happy and Safe Fourth of July!!!!




Top Ten Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips


By Yahaira Cespedes


Like many Americans, you may be planning to have a festive Fourth of July. Along with barbeques and day at the beach, no July holiday celebration would be complete without enjoying the fireworks that celebrate the birth of our nation.

Perhaps you are considering staying at home and planning a get-together with friends and family. Or, you may want to go check out your local professional fireworks display. While putting the finishing touches on your planned celebration, take a moment to consider your pets.

Unlike people, pets don’t associate the noise, flashes, and burning smell of pyrotechnics with celebrations. Pets are terrified of fireworks, and often panic at the loud whizzes and bangs they produce.

Because of this, the American Humane Association reports that July 5 is the busiest day of the year for animal shelters. Why? In a 2005 press release the Indiana Proactive Animal Welfare, Inc. (PAW) stated that animal shelters the day after Fourth of July are “inundated with pets that panicked at the noise of firecrackers and fled into the night, winding up lost, injured or killed.”

Both the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and PAW have listed ways you can prevent your holiday celebration from turning into a tragedy. Here are 10 tips on how to keep your pet from panicking this Fourth of July weekend.

10. Keep your Pet Indoors at All Times!


It may seem obvious, but even if your pet is used to being outside, the resulting panic caused by fireworks or other loud noises may make them break their restraint or jump a fence in a terrified attempt to find safety.

9. Don’t Put Insect Repellant on Your Pet that isn’t Specifically for Pet Use


The same tip applies to applying “people” sunscreen on your pet. What isn’t toxic to humans can be toxic to animals. The ASPCA lists the poisonous effects of sunscreen on your pet as, “…drooling, vomitingdiarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy.” DEET, a common insecticide, may cause neurological issues.

8. Alcoholic Drinks Poison Pets


If your pet drinks alcohol, they can become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma, or in severe cases, die from respiratory failure. Yes, even beer is toxic; fermented hops and ethanol are poisonous to dogs and cats.

7. Going to a Fireworks Display? Leave Your Pet at Home


The safest place for your pet is at home, not in a crowded, unfamiliar and noisy place. The combination of too many people and loud fireworks will make your beloved pet freak out and desperately seek shelter. Locking them in the car is also not an option; your pet may suffer brain damage and heat stroke.

6. Have Your Pet Properly Identified


If your pet manages to break loose and become lost, without proper identification it will be that much harder to get them back. Consider fitting your pet with microchip identification, ID tags with their name and your phone number, or both. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your pets in case you have to put up signs.


5. Keep Your Pet Away from Glow Jewelry


It might look cute, but your pet could chew up and swallow the plastic adornments. The ASPCA states that while not highly toxic, “excessive drooling and gastrointestinalirritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.”

4. NEVER Use Fireworks Around Pets


While lit fireworks can pose a danger to curious pets and potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws, even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Some fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as arsenic, potassium nitrate, and other heavy metals.

3. Don’t Give Your Pet “Table Food”


If you are having a backyard barbeque, you may be tempted to slip some snacks to your pet. But like beer and chocolate, there are other festive foods that could harm your pet. Onions, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough are all possible hazards for dogs and cats.

2. Lighter Fluid and Matches Are Harmful to Pets.


The ASPCA lists chlorates as a harmful chemical substance found in some matches that, if ingested, can cause your pet difficulty in breathing, damage blood cells or even cause kidney disease. If exposed to lighter fluid, your pet may sustain skin irritation on contact, respiratory problems if inhaled, and gastric problems if ingested.

1. Citronella Insect Control Products Harm Pets, Too.


Oils, candles, insect coils and other citronella-based repellants are irritating toxins to pets, according to the ASPCA. The result of inhalation can cause severe respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia, and ingestion can harm your pet’s nervous system.

***

The safest and best bet for celebrating this Fourth of July with your pets is to exclude them from holiday festivities, at least this time around. Instead, find a safe, secure spot in the home for your pets while you go out and enjoy the loud bangs, bright lights and spectator fun. Your pets will appreciate the quiet a lot more than you’ll enjoy the noise.