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Monday, November 28, 2016

Riverdale Residential Fire Fatality - Sheridan Street (November 23)

MEDIA CONTACT ONLY: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
MEBrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department regretfully announces a fire related death of a Riverdale resident. 

On Wednesday, November 23 at about 4:30 am, firefighter/medics operated at the scene of a working house fire in the 6300 block of Sheridan Street in Riverdale.  An adult female was rescued by firefighters and transported by medics to the Medstar Washington Hospital Center Burn Unit.  The patient, a 74-year-old female was suffering from burn and smoke inhalation injuries and was in critical condition.

Despite the heroic efforts of firefighters, diligent pre-hospital medical care by medics combined with the very best care of emergency department and burn unit medical staff the patient succumbed to her injuries on Sunday afternoon, November 27.

The deceased is identified as Emily Novotny, DOB 7-21-1942, 74 years-of-age, of Riverdale, Maryland.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation; however, it appears that the cause of the fire will be accidental.

This is the ninth fire fatality, with accidental cause, in Prince George’s County this calendar year.

Recent years residential fire related fatalities of accidental origin:

2015 - 3
2014 - 5


Groundbreaking Ceremony for New Shady Glen Community Fire/EMS Station is December 1st


Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker, III

and

Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor

cordially invite you to attend a

Groundbreaking Ceremony

for the upcoming

Shady Glen Community Fire/Emergency Medical Services Station

On

Thursday, December 1, 2016, at 10:00 a.m.

The ceremony will be held at 100 Shady Glen Drive, Capitol Heights

Please R.S.V.P by November 30, 2016, to 301-883-5204

Light refreshments will be served following the ceremony



Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Riverdale House Fire with Civilian Rescue - Sheridan Street

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
MEBrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

A Riverdale mother and daughter have many reasons to be thankful today.  Thankful for a working smoke alarm and firefighters that arrived quickly, rushed into their burning home and rescued the unconscious critically injured mother.  Just after 4:30 am, November 23, a fire appears to have started in the kitchen of their 1 ½ -story, Cape Cod style, single-family home in the 6300 block of Sheridan Street. 

A working smoke alarm alerted the occupants and they started to make their way outside to safety.  The mother uses a wheelchair and was unable to successfully make her way out of a hospital bed in the burning home even with her daughter’s assistance.  The elder female called 911 and quickly explained the situation while her daughter ran to a neighbor’s house for help.  Neighbors were awakened to find fire coming from the rear of their neighbor’s house made additional 911 calls.

A Public Safety Communication 911 call taker talking to the trapped woman detailed information about the location of the occupant to dispatchers by way of the computer aided dispatch system.  Dispatchers provided the updates by way of the radio to responding firefighters.  Just before firefighters arrived the 911-call taker could only hear silence as the female went unconscious.  The next sound she heard over the open 911-phone line was that of firefighters radios.

Within minutes after being dispatched an unconscious female had been located and removed to the homes exterior by firefighters.  Awaiting medics treated the critically injured patient and transported her to an area Burn Unit.  The daughter sustained minor injuries and transported to a local hospital.  Good news from the Burn Unit was that the female’s condition had improved from Critical to Serious and Stable and is expected to survive her injuries.

The fire consumed the rear portion of the home with high heat and thick smoke throughout the structure.  The fire was extinguished within 12 minutes of arrival.

While the area of origin appears to be the first floor kitchen the official cause of the fire remains under investigation.  Fire loss is estimated at $50,000.

Firefighters returned to the Riverdale neighborhood this afternoon armed with fire safety information and boxes of new 10-year smoke alarms.  Firefighters went door-to-door answering neighbor’s questions about the fire and checking smoke alarms to ensure they were working.  If a home was found without a working smoke alarm a new alarm was installed and tested before firefighters left the house.

Smoke alarms should be tested on the first day of every month and replaced after 10 years of use.  Only 10-year smoke alarms should be used to replace older alarms.  Any Prince George’s County resident needing a new alarm can call 311 and ask about our smoke alarm program. 


A home escape plan that identifies 2 ways out of every room in your house with a designated meeting place outside should also be in place and practiced at least twice a year.

The rear portion of the house, where the kitchen is located, sustained the majority of the fire damge




Firefighters went door-to-door checking for working smoke alarms in neighborhood where the fire occurred today.



Firefighters went door-to-door checking for working smoke alarms in neighborhood where the fire occurred today.


Firefighters went door-to-door checking for working smoke alarms in neighborhood where the fire occurred today.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Groundbreaking of Public Safety Pier at National Harbor


Media should park on gravel parking lot in the rear of the Sunoco Gas Station as you approach National Harbor.

Mark E. Brady
Chief Spokesperson
240-508-7930
@PGFDPIO

It's Thanksgiving Week - Safety Tips for Cooking and More

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department offers the following safety tips, to ensure that all citizens and residents will enjoy a safe and festive Thanksgiving holiday. Unfortunately, fire safety and injury prevention guidelines are often overlooked during the holidays. Prince George's County Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor stated, "Everyone needs to keep Safety First and by doing so our citizens, visitors and businesses can avoid tragedy and disruption of their holiday festivities."

The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) United States Fire Administration (USFA) issued a special report recently examining the characteristics of Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings. The report, Thanksgiving Day Fires in Residential Buildings, was developed by USFA's National Fire Data Center.

The report is based on 2011 to 2013 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS).  For each year, an estimated 2,100 residential building fires were reported to fire departments in the U.S. on Thanksgiving Day and caused an estimated 10 deaths, 50 injuries and $28 million in property loss.  The leading cause of Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings is, by far, cooking. Additionally, smoke alarms were not present in 20 percent of Thanksgiving Day fires that occurred in occupied residential buildings.

If your Thanksgiving plans include a Turkey Fryer, this is another whole story by itself, click here for Turkey Fryer Safety Tips.

These safety tips work for every day of the year, however, home fires increase dramatically, twice as many, on Thanksgiving Day.  While these safety and cooking tips may not make Thanksgiving dinner taste any better--they will help to avoid potential disaster;

    Overnight guests should be instructed on your exit drill from the home and designated meeting place for your family.  Sleep with bedroom doors closed.

    Have a fire extinguisher available not more than 10 feet from the stove, on the exit side of the room.

    A standard Class ABC multi-purpose dry chemical extinguisher is recommended. Know how to use your fire extinguisher.

    Start holiday cooking with a clean stove and oven.

    Keep the kitchen off limits to young children and adults who are not helping with food preparations. This will lessen the possibility of kitchen mishaps.

    When cooking, do not wear clothing with loose sleeves or dangling jewelry. Clothing can catch on fire and jewelry can become entangled with pot handles, causing spills and burns.

    Cook on the back burners when possible, and turn pot handles inward so they don’t extend over the edge of the stove.

    Never leave cooking unattended. If you must leave the kitchen while cooking, turn off the stove or have someone else watch what is being cooked. Unattended cooking is the number one cause of home fires and fire-related injuries in Prince George’s County.  According to the USFA; cooking is the leading cause of all Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings at 69 percent. Nearly all of these cooking fires (97 percent) are small, confined fires with limited damage.

    If you use a deep fryer, please, exercise extreme caution and follow manufacturer instructions.  The report from the USFA found that these cooking devices accounted for about 1% of Thanksgiving Day fires.

    Keep Thanksgiving decorations and kitchen clutter away from sources of direct heat.

    Candles are often part of holiday decorations. The Fire/EMS Department strongly encourages the use of battery powered candles and discourages the use of candles with an open flame.  If you use candles; they should never be left burning when you are away from home, or after going to bed. Candles should be placed where children will not be tempted to play with them, and where guests will not accidentally brush against them. The candleholder should be completely non-combustible and difficult to knock over. The candle should not have combustible decorations around it.

    If smoking is allowed inside, provide guests with large, deep ashtrays and check them frequently. After guests leave check inside, under upholstery, and in trash cans for cigarette butts that may be smoldering.

    10-year smoke alarms are required on every level of your home, in hallways just outside of sleeping areas and in every bedroom.  Sleep with your bedroom door closed and test smoke alarms on the Safety First Day of every month.

Working smoke alarms are required in all residences in Prince George's County.  Consider upgrading to a 10-year tamper proof with hush feature smoke alarm and never change a battery again.  If you can not afford to purchase an alarm you can call 311.  A firefighter will install a working smoke alarm in your home; free of charge.

The men and women; volunteer, civilian and paid, of the Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department wish everyone a Happy and Safe Thanksgiving!!!

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Colder Weather Safety Tips

  • Have a working 10-year smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector  on every level of your home and in every bedroom.
  • Design and practice an escape drill from your home.  Identify 2 ways out of every room and a safe meeting place outside.  Practice your plan, at least twice a year, when you test your smoke alarms on the first day of every month.  Sadly many residential fire related fatalities involve our senior and our youngest family members.  Often this is due to mobility challenges and not knowing what to do in an emergency.  Plan and Practice escape drills.
  • As we transition into colder weather and less daylight, use space heaters safely providing a safety area of 3-feet from anything that can burn and never leave space heaters or candles burning unattended.
  • Now is a good time to call a HVAC Technician to have them check your heating system and have your fireplace and chimney cleaned and inspected.

Colder Weather Safety Tips

  • Have a working 10-year smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector  on every level of your home and in every bedroom.
  • Design and practice an escape drill from your home.  Identify 2 ways out of every room and a safe meeting place outside.  Practice your plan, at least twice a year, when you test your smoke alarms on the first day of every month.  Sadly many residential fire related fatalities involve our senior and our youngest family members.  Often this is due to mobility challenges and not knowing what to do in an emergency.  Plan and Practice escape drills.
  • As we transition into colder weather and less daylight, use space heaters safely providing a safety area of 3-feet from anything that can burn and never leave space heaters or candles burning unattended.
  • Now is a good time to call a HVAC Technician to have them check your heating system and have your fireplace and chimney cleaned and inspected.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Trench Rescue in Greenbelt - Images from Scene

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
MEBrady@co.pg.md.us     @PGFDPIO

A construction worker is alive and is in good spirits this morning as he recovers from unspecified injuries in a Trauma Center this morning.  Just before 1:00 pm, Wednesday, November 16, Prince George's County Firefighter/Medics and the Departments Technical Rescue Team were alerted to a "trench rescue" near Greenbelt Lake in the 500 block of Crescent Road in Greenbelt.  Sixty Firefighter/Medics and Technical Rescue personnel worked for about 5 hours in freeing the man.

Upon arrival personnel found that an adult male, 50ish years of age, was trapped chest deep in a 12-foot trench.  When the trench collapse first occurred the man was completely covered with dirt.  Co-workers went to his aid and removed dirt from around his head and upper chest allowing him to breath.

The Technical rescue team went work in shoring up the first walls and accessing the victim.  An oxygen line was passed on to the victim that remained conscious and alert throughout the ordeal.  Warm air was pumped in to the trench as personnel removed handful after handful of dirt from around the victim.  Dirt soon turned to mud slowing the tedious task of freeing the trapped victim.

A Technical Rescue Team from Howard County was brought to the scene after about 3 hours into the incident. Prince George's and Howard County rescuers worked seamlessly in freeing the victim.

At about 6:00 pm, 5 hours after airing on the scene the victim was removed from the tench.  Medics treated him on the scene and the man was flown on-board US Park Eagle 1 to a trauma center for treatment of his injuries.  Injuries were non life threatening.


 All images by Mark E. Brady, PGFD PIO