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Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Roadways Known to Flood During Heavy Rains

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief spokesperson, 240-508-7930

mebrady@co.pg.md.us     TWITTER @PGFDPIO



Roadways Known to Flood During Heavy Rains

Areas and roadways in Prince George's County that are prone to flash flooding include:

Brock Bridge Road near Laurel-Bowie Road (RT 197) Laurel

Areas along Route 1 and Main Street in Laurel

Baltimore Ave and Ammendale Road in Beltsville

Sunnyside Avenue between Rhode Island Ave and Edmonston Rd in Beltsville

Piney Branch Rd and New Hampshire in Adelphi

Portions of Riverdale Road in Riverdale Park

Governors Bridge Road at Anne Arundel/Prince George's County border.  Road is currently closed for bridge work (unrelated to this storm)

Water Street in Upper Marlboro

Marlboro Pike and Largo Rd in Upper Marlboro

Livingston Road and Oxon Hill Road in Ft Washington

Livingston Road and Palmer Road in Fort Washington

These roads should be avoided during periods of heavy rain and heed any signage posted.  Any and all roads could suddenly become overwhelmed by flooding waters. Do not drive through standing or swift moving water.
Flood Facts...

Flash floods occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall or a dam failure. Flooding is a longer-term event and may last a week or more.

Most flash flooding is caused by (1) slow-moving thunderstorms, (2) thunder-storms repeatedly moving over the same area or (3) heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms.

Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, and destroy buildings and bridges.

Densely populated areas have a high risk for flash floods. The construction of buildings, highways, driveways, and parking lots increases runoff by reducing the amount of rain absorbed by the ground.

Water can erode the roadbed creating unsafe driving conditions.

Many flash floods occur at night when flooded roads are hard to see.

2 feet of water will float your car, truck or SUV!!! 6 inches of fast-moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.

Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are auto related. If your car stalls, leave it and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely.

Underpasses can fill rapidly with water, while the adjacent roadway remains clear. Driving into a flooded underpass can quickly put you in 5-6 feet of water.

Flood Safety Tips...

Never try to walk, swim, or drive through swift-moving floodwater. Remember, 2 feet of water will float your vehicle and 6 inches of fast moving floodwater can knock you off your feet. 

If you come upon floodwaters, STOP, TURN AROUND AND GO ANOTHER WAY!! 

Do not attempt to drive through a flooded road.

CANCELLED - Thursday 11:00 am Press Conference

A Press Conference that had been scheduled for Thursday, May 1, 2014, at 11:00 am has been cancelled.  Fire Chief Marc Bashoor regrets to cancel this event, however, with the increasing potential for flooding and hazardous conditions he felt it was in the best interest of safety for everyone involved to cancel the event.

We will continue to post our Safety First Day of the Month of May reminders which will include remarks prepared by Fire Chief Bashoor.  The Chief was to announce our current low fire fatality rate, recent success stories of working smoke alarms and the programs instituted that have helped us to achieve these goals.

Firefighters were prepared to go door-to-door throughout communities checking smoke alarms and providing fire safety information.  They will re-schedule the door-to-door campaign for next Wednesday, May 7.


CANCELLED

MEDIA ADVISORY - PRESS CONFERENCE - Safety Measures and Smoke Alarms


MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     Twitter: @PGFDPIO

In 2013, The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services Department witnessed an alarming rise in the number of residential fires that resulted in fire fatalities, recording 13 residential fire fatalities, compared to single-digits in the previous year. 

Seeking to improve public awareness of this challenge in order to reverse this trend, Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor introduced a series of new public awareness initiatives to keep homes and families safe in Prince George’s County. 

To date, the results have been dramatic.  Prince George’s County has witnessed a marked increase in the number of incidents where residents have been awakened and alerted to a fire by the sound of a working smoke alarm.  As a result, the County is currently on pace to record one of its lowest annual residential fatality rates in years.

Thursday, May 1, 2014, marks our “Safety first Day of the Month” - Just one of the many “Safety First” programs to assure, Everyone Goes Home”.

The men and women of the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department will begin the day by participating in a Press Conference with Fire Chief Bashoor.  Staff will then depart to conduct a door-to-door campaign to check smoke alarms.  Firefighters will install a 10-year smoke alarm in any home that lacks the valuable protection of a working smoke alarm.

A representative from KIDDE Safety Products will also be on hand to discuss the 10-year smoke and CO alarm technology and why these new alarms will save lives.

WHAT: Press Conference – Safety Measures and Smoke Alarms

WHEN: Thursday, May 1, 2014, 11:00 am

WHERE: Capitol Heights Fire/EMS Station #805, 6061 Central Avenue, Capitol Heights

WHO:     Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor, Command Staff, Firefighter/Paramedics, rep from KIDDE 

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Class Vacancies in Train-The-Trainer Classes at National Fire Academy

The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) has openings in Train-The-Trainers classes at the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, MD.  The following All-Hazard classes currently have vacancies:


E-976 Finance/Admin Unit Leader TtT;  May 28 - 30, 2014.
E-972  Facilities Unit Leader TtT; June 16 - 20, 2014.
E-966  Resources Unit Leader TtT; July 7 - 10, 2014. 

For additional information on how to apply and the stipends available visit their website by clicking here.

The course manager is Robert L. Ridgeway, Training Specialist, at the 
Integrated Emergency Management Branch, National Emergency Training Center, 
Emergency Management Institute/FEMA/DHS, located at 16825 South Seton Avenue
Emmitsburg, MD. 21727.  He may be contacted via Email at:  robert.ridgeway@fema.dhs.gov


FLASH FLOOD WATCH POSTED - STAY SAFE!!!


MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
MEBRADY@CO.PG.MD.US     TWITTER @PGFDPIO

The U.S. National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for Prince George’s County and surrounding jurisdictions from Tuesday evening, April 29 through Wednesday night.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STATEMENT

405 AM EDT TUE APR 29 2014

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH LATE WEDNESDAY NIGHT...

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY

* FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH LATE WEDNESDAY NIGHT

* RAIN WILL CONTINUE THROUGH WEDNESDAY NIGHT...WITH THE HEAVIEST RAIN EXPECTED TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

STORM TOTAL RAINFALL AMOUNTS WILL AVERAGE BETWEEN 3 AND 5 INCHES WITH LOCALLY HIGHER AMOUNTS LIKELY.

* HEAVY AMOUNTS OF RAIN IN SHORT PERIODS OF TIME MAY CAUSE FLASH FLOODING OF CREEKS...STREAMS AND URBAN AREAS.

Precautionary/preparedness actions: A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation. Be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

Flash Flood Facts...

Flash floods occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall or a dam failure. Flooding is a longer-term event and may last a week or more.

Most flash flooding is caused by (1) slow-moving thunderstorms, (2) thunder-storms repeatedly moving over the same area or (3) heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms.

Flash floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, and destroy buildings and bridges.

Densely populated areas have a high risk for flash floods. The construction of buildings, highways, driveways, and parking lots increases runoff by reducing the amount of rain absorbed by the ground.

Water can erode the roadbed creating unsafe driving conditions.

Many flash floods occur at night when flooded roads are hard to see.

2 feet of water will float your car, truck or SUV!!! 6 inches of fast-moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.

Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are auto related. If your car stalls, leave it and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely.

Underpasses can fill rapidly with water, while the adjacent roadway remains clear. Driving into a flooded underpass can quickly put you in 5-6 feet of water.

The Prince George's County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department wants you to stay safe during this potentially dangerous weather conditions.  Help us by helping yourself and heed warnings and safety tips.


Flash Flood Safety Tips...

Never try to walk, swim, or drive through swift-moving floodwater. Remember, 2 feet of water will float your vehicle and 6 inches of fast moving floodwater can knock you off your feet.

If you come upon floodwaters, STOP, TURN AROUND AND GO ANOTHER WAY!!

Do not attempt to drive through a flooded road.

If your car stalls, leave it and seek higher ground, if you can do so safely.

Stay informed about the storm and possible flooding by listening to your NOAA weather radio, commercial radio or television.

STAY INFORMED - STAY READY - STAY SAFE!!!

Monday, April 28, 2014

Tuesday Evening - Sharing & Showcasing Education Excellence & Innovation in Prince George's County


MEDIA ADVISORY - PRESS CONFERENCE - Safety Measures and Smoke Alarms


MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     Twitter: @PGFDPIO

In 2013, The Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services Department witnessed an alarming rise in the number of residential fires that resulted in fire fatalities, recording 13 residential fire fatalities, compared to single-digits in the previous year. 

Seeking to improve public awareness of this challenge in order to reverse this trend, Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor introduced a series of new public awareness initiatives to keep homes and families safe in Prince George’s County. 

To date, the results have been dramatic.  Prince George’s County has witnessed a marked increase in the number of incidents where residents have been awakened and alerted to a fire by the sound of a working smoke alarm.  As a result, the County is currently on pace to record one of its lowest annual residential fatality rates in years.

Thursday, May 1, 2014, marks our “Safety first Day of the Month” - Just one of the many “Safety First” programs to assure, Everyone Goes Home”.

The men and women of the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department will begin the day by participating in a Press Conference with Fire Chief Bashoor.  Staff will then depart to conduct a door-to-door campaign to check smoke alarms.  Firefighters will install a 10-year smoke alarm in any home that lacks the valuable protection of a working smoke alarm.

A representative from KIDDE Safety Products will also be on hand to discuss the 10-year smoke and CO alarm technology and why these new alarms will save lives.

WHAT: Press Conference – Safety Measures and Smoke Alarms

WHEN: Thursday, May 1, 2014, 11:00 am

WHERE: Capitol Heights Fire/EMS Station #805, 6061 Central Avenue, Capitol Heights

WHO:     Fire Chief Marc S. Bashoor, Command Staff, Firefighter/Paramedics, rep from KIDDE 

PGFD Firefighter/Medic Competing in NBC "American Ninja Warrior"

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson, 240-508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us     Twitter @PGFDPIO


A Prince George’s County Firefighter/Medic is vying for another title in front of his name; America Ninja Warrior.  Aric Lee, 38 years-of-age, is a nine-year member of the Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department ((PGFD) and is in Miami Florida competing for the title.  Currently assigned to the Paramedic Unit at the College Park Fire/EMS Department Station 812 Lee has taken leave to compete for the second time in the past three years for the distinction of American Ninja Warrior.  Firefighter Lee has prepared himself both mentally and physically for the competition. 

The NBC website says this about the 2014 show,

Everyone's favorite heart-racing obstacle course competition series, "American  Ninja Warrior," returns for a sixth season Monday, May 26 (9:00 – 11:00 p.m. ET/PT). With original episodes presented exclusively on NBC this season, the two-hour show will air through the summer on Monday nights at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT. The finale will air Sept. 15 (9:00 p.m. ET/PT).

Matt Iseman returns as host, along with former NFL player Akbar Gbaja-Biamila (NFL Network). Jenn Brown (NFL Network) serves as co-host.


The action-packed premiere follows competitors as they tackle a series of challenging obstacle courses in both qualifying and finals rounds across the country. Those that successfully complete a course in their designated region will move on to the national finals round in Las Vegas, where they face a stunning four-stage course modeled after the famed Mt. Midoriyama in Japan.

This season, the series will travel to five cities in search of the ultimate athlete - Los Angeles, Dallas, St. Louis, Miami and Denver - before heading to Las Vegas. Men and women from all walks of life will vie for the title of "American Ninja Warrior," including school teachers and firemen, current and former members of the military, amateur sports enthusiasts and even a few Olympic gold medalists.

In order to guarantee a spot in the national finals, competitors must successfully complete the finals course in their respective city. From there, competitors will travel to Las Vegas and earn the chance to win the title of 

"American Ninja Warrior," along with the $500,000 grand prize.

Based on the global hit "Sasuke," from the Tokyo Broadcasting System Television, the original series is in production for its 30th season and only three contestants have completed the course.

"American Ninja Warrior" is executive produced by A. Smith & Co. Productions' founders Arthur Smith and Kent Weed ("Hell's Kitchen," "I Survived a Japanese Game Show," "Pros vs. Joes").

Fire Fighter/Medic Aric Lee feels better prepared for this years competition and is looking forward to the start of shows production.  While competing , Lee is bound to some degree of “secrecy” as he progresses through the event.  You can follow him on Facebook here.




Two Sons, Firefighter/Medics for PGFD, Ride with Dad, Retiring After 35 Years of Service in Montgomery County

Talk about "Take Your Kids to Work Day" this was a family reunion on April 24, 2014.  This was the final day of a 35 year career for Master Fire Fighter Steve Wiseman of the Montgomery County Department of Fire/Rescue Services.  His two sons, John and Jason, are officers with the Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department, surprised him by being part of his crew that day.




A local firefighter affectionately known as "Superman" will be retiring after spending more than 35 years on the force.
Steve "Superman" Wiseman once saved eight people from a burning house, all while wearing gym shorts. 
"I had some close calls in my life but that was probably one of the closest," Wiseman said.
And it's not the daring, life-saving rescue that got him the nickname.
Wiseman had just gone through a bevvy of operations -- two knee surgeries, a neck fusion, a back operation -- and immediately returned back to work at the Montgomery County Fire Department.
"My body has been telling me for the past couple years it's time to go, it's starting to break down a little bit," he said. 
Family, friends and co-workers shared affectionate stories of "Superman" Wednesday.
"It's very emotional," Wiseman said. "I feel like I'm losing a part of my family."
Though he is retiring, his two sons -- firefighters with the Prince George's County Fire Department -- will continue his legacy. 
"The apple doesn't fall far from the tree!" Wiseman joked. 
Wiseman, a single father, raised his boys in College Park.
"I look at them and I say, 'We did good.' I've raised my boys on baseball and the fire department."
He told News4's Zachary Kiesch after 35 years, he could operate a fire engine's seemingly complicated levers blindfolded. 
"I loved going to work because I knew I was going to make a difference in somebody's life," Wiseman said.
On his last day, Wiseman got to work with his two sons.
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Md. (WJLA) - Montgomery County Master Firefighter Steve Wiseman is making one of the last calls of his 35-year career, one of the most special.

On Thursday, Wiseman took a ride on the fire truck with his sons, Jason and John Wiseman. Both  followed him into the fire service and rose up through the ranks of Prince George’s County Fire Department.

“There’s not a prouder person on this piece than me that my sons are following in my footsteps like they are. It just doesn’t get more rewarding than that,” the eldest Wiseman said. “I raised them on two things I knew, and that was baseball and the fire department.”

Riding with his sons is memorable, but bittersweet, he said.

Over the years, he’s passed up promotions so he could always be there for his sons but that didn’t mean passing up the opportunity to help people.

In 2013, he rescued eight people using only a single ladder. That was one of his most memorable calls, Steve Wiseman said.

Other firefighters have given him the name, “Superman” because he seems to things that no other person can do.

“He’s probably the most passionate person in this career out there and he still says to this day, ‘I love waking up and going to work.’” his son, Lt. Jason Wiseman said.

Now as one season of his life draws to a close, he prepares for another role, one of full-time grandfather.

“I’ve been blessed with a great family the fire department is my second famly and I’ve been blessed with a great career,” Steve Wiseman said.



All of these firefighters started their fire services career at the Branchville Volunteer Fire Company in
College Park.


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